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Idina Menzel Talks Motherhood and Bi-Racial Family

The adorable and talented Idina Menzel (famous for her powerhouse voice and her amazing portrayal of Elphaba on Broadway's production of Wicked) was on the Ellen Show today talking about her beautiful family and adventures in motherhood.  She joked that she thought having a son would mean being surrounded by two men (husband and son) who would tell her she's beautiful all the time - which didn't actually happen.  Lol.  Yup, welcome to the mommy club Idena.  Menzel marveled that now when she cuddles her 3 year old son, he turns her head away and tells her she has bad breath.  And now he's taken to grabbing the loose skin she says she acquired now that she's 41.  Oh kids.  Keeping us prima donnas grounded everyday.  My son loves to point out when I haven't shaved.  He's obsessed with it.  It kind of freaks me out.

Anyways, Menzel also spoke of another interesting situation - raising a child in a bi-racial family (she's married to actor Tye Diggs).  It wasn't a serious convo, just a silly little anecdote, but i found it interesting.  She says her son is now associating white  people with either mommy or vanilla and black people with daddy or chocolate.  Kind of cute.  I think raising a bi-racial child can be either as complex or a simple as you want it to be.  Her story made me think about my own little family.  A few months ago Miles was really interested in the fact that mommy and his grandparents had brown skin, while his dad's skin was white.  And he would go back and forth between saying he was white or brown.  We acknowledged the conversation, but tried not to make it dramatic.  And you know, he hasn't talked about it sense.  We try to have a lot of different images around the house and expose him different things.  Ideally, we want the race conversation to be an organic conversation, not forced and uncomfortable, and I think it is wonderful that my son will grow up with so many different cultures to relate to.  It will be interesting to see if he starts asking more questions again soon.

A Belated Happy New Year

Miles & The Nutcracker